Arts & Markets

as part of Computational Media + Cultures Master’s Program

 

The Arts & Markets track is a part of the Computational Media Master’s Program (CMAC) offered by the Department of Art, Art History and Visual studies (AAHVS) in partnership with the Information Science + Studies Program. The goal of this program is to explore, analytically and historically, the emergence of new art markets as well as interactions between market behavior and artistic creation, art theory and practice, as well as the role of art entrepreneurship and regulatory environments in emerging art markets.

 

MA Program description

The MA program consists of three semesters and one summer, and begins in the Fall term. During the first year you will learn the history of Art Markets and subjects related to ongoing scholarly debate in the field by following our two DALMI Courses: “History of Art Markets coursecodes” (lecture) and “Art & Markets” (seminar). Next to this, you will have the opportunity to conduct independent research in your own area of research through a DALMI Independent Study supervised by Professor Hans van Miegroet. Both in the first Fall and Spring semester there is space to enroll into a wide variety of elective courses inside and outside AAHVS. During the summer, you will conduct individual research towards your thesis by applicable relevant data, visiting relevant sites or participating in a relevant internship. The last semester of your master will focused on the writing of your hybrid theory-practice MA thesis (via two independent studies), which will finally be presented at the end of the Fall.

 

screen-shot-2016-12-05-at-11-34-17-am*The program is subject to change

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History of Art Markets

The goal of this course is to explore, analytically and historically, the emergence of new art markets as well as interactions between market behavior and artistic creation, art theory and practice, as well as the role of art entrepreneurship and regulatory environments in emerging art markets. We will compare representative examples of emerging markets horizontally in various places of the world, as well as chronologically. This also involves at times a very detailed historical analysis of various socioeconomic, regulatory and art historical contexts to understand how and where new art market segments emerged (or were not able to develop fully), the entrepreneurial roles played by participants in these markets and how all this shaped very specific visual culture(s). Throughout this chronological overview, we will also study representative examples of art entrepreneurship, local product differentiation in the arts and the many innovative marketing strategies deployed by artists and dealers in various regions of the world in the early modern, modern and contemporary periods.

In order to accomplish this overview of the history of art markets in an effective manner, the course is structured both thematically and chronologically. The chronological organization is necessary to identify several pivotal moments of change and to analyze the factors that caused these changes. The thematic organization will help us to identify causally related economic, legal and art historical principles behind some of these changes. The emergence of the most innovative infrastructures for buying, selling and displaying art affected both local and international art supply and demand for art and its attendant equilibrium structures.

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Admission

To apply, prospective students must submit an online application through the Duke University Graduate School. Applications must include a statement of purposethree letters of recommendation, as well as transcripts and scores from the GRE General exam. International applicants must submit English language proficiency test scores if English is not their first language. Applications will be vetted by a committee comprised of AAHVS Faculty and the CMAC Lab Directors, who will select students based on their qualifications and on the Lab’s ability to take on new students in a given year. More information on application requirements can be found at the Graduate School’s Online Application FAQ.

Please note that Duke University does not provide financial support for master’s-level graduate study, but applicants are urged to compete for national and foundation awards or seek student loans. A website maintained by Duke’s Office of Research Support lists awards available from a variety of federal and private sources. Questions about financial aid should be directed to the Graduate School’s financial aid coordinator.

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